How to Measure a V-Belt

Each and every application that uses a v-belt needs a certain belt to run properly. There are two measurements that we need to make sure that you get the proper belt. Those measurements are length and width. This video above will explain how to properly measure each of these variables.

Kevlar Vs. Standard V-Belts

Kevlar belts are created to be stronger than standard v-belts. In a Kevlar belt, the normal polyester cords are replaced with the much stronger Kevlar cords. When using machinery with a back side idler, the belt takes a beating and normal belts can wear out faster. Kevlar belts are made to last longer in these situations.

Cogged V-Belts Vs. Standard V-Belts

Cogged v-belts are like standard v-belts. The main difference is the cogs that are cut into the belt. To many applications these “cogs” are vital to ensuring the long life of your belt. A cogged belt wraps around a small pulley much easier than a standard belt. Cogged belts are also very good at dissipating heat.

Timing Belts

Timing belts, (also known as toothed, notch, cog, or synchronous belts) are a positive transfer belt and can track relative movement. These belts have teeth that fit into a matching toothed pulley. When correctly tensioned, they have no slippage, run at constant speed, and are often used to transfer direct motion for indexing or timing purposes (hence their name). They are often used in lieu of chains or gears, so there is less noise and a lubrication bath is not necessary. Camshafts of automobiles, miniature timing systems, and stepper motors often utilize these belts. Timing belts need the least tension of all belts, and are among the most efficient. They can bear up to 200 hp (150 kW) at speeds of 16,000 ft/min. Timing belts with a helical offset tooth design are available. The helical offset tooth design forms a chevron pattern and causes the teeth to engage progressively. The chevron pattern design is self-aligning. The chevron pattern design does not make the noise that some timing belts make at certain speeds, and is more efficient at transferring power (up to 98%). Disadvantages include a relatively high purchase cost, the need for specially fabricated toothed pulleys, less protection from overloading and jamming, and the lack of clutch action

Variable Speed Belts

Variable speed belts, just like timing belts, have their own special uses. These belts are most commonly used on applications like Go-Karts and industrial applications like band saws or anything with a clutching system. The angle on a variable speed belt is different than that of a standard v-belt which allows the clutching system of these applications to work properly. The measurements that we will need to get you the proper belt are: Length of your belt and the width of your belt.

Banded Belts

Banded belts are a number of belts put together with a bonding across the back to keep them together. These belts are used in many heavy duty applications. The reason that these are used rather than many singles is because when you put all the belts together you increase the strength of the belt. They also allow you to get uniform tensioning across the whole belt.

Serpentine Belts

Each and every application that uses a v-belt needs a certain belt to run properly. There are two measurements that we need to make sure that you get the proper belt. Those measurements are length and width. This video above will explain how to properly measure each of these variables.

Flat Belts

Flat belts were used early in line shafting to transmit power in factories. They were also used in countless farming, mining, and logging applications, such as bucksaws, sawmills, threshers, silo blowers, conveyors for filling corn cribs or haylofts, balers, water pumps (for wells, mines, or swampy farm fields), and electrical generators. The flat belt is a simple system of power transmission that was well suited for its day. It delivered high power for high speeds (500 hp for 10,000 ft/min), in cases of wide belts and large pulleys. These drives are bulky, requiring high tension leading to high loads, so vee belts have mainly replaced the flat-belts except when high speed is needed over power. The Industrial Revolution soon demanded more from the system, and flat belt pulleys needed to be carefully aligned to prevent the belt from slipping off. Because flat belts tend to climb towards the higher side of the pulley, pulleys were made with a slightly convex or "crowned" surface (rather than flat) to keep the belts centered. Flat belts also tend to slip on the pulley face when heavy loads are applied and many proprietary dressings were available that could be applied to the belts to increase friction, and so power transmission. Grip was better if the belt was assembled with the hair (i.e. outer) side of the leather against the pulley although belts were also often given a half-twist before joining the ends, so that wear was evenly distributed on both sides of the belt (DB). Belts were joined by lacing the ends together with leather thonging, or later by steel comb fasteners. A good modern use for a flat belt is with smaller pulleys and large central distances. They can connect inside and outside pulleys, and can come in both endless and jointed construction.

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